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20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
with israel's new governing coalition sworn into office today. >> ifill: paul solman reports on older workers in academic institutions, professors in the classroom long past age 65. >> am i keeping track of jobs? yes. that's okay. as long as i'm a good teacher, that's what's important. >> woodruff: and we examine the republican national committee's call for a new direction for the g.o.p., a road map hoping for a rebound in 2016 and beyond. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registrati
arizona and the federal government related to immigration issues. over the summer, the supreme court upheld part of a top state law that allowed police to check for immigration papers. other states, including alabama, georgia, kansas and tennessee, have similar laws on the books and a number of other states are also considering comparable measures. the obama administration supports the challenge to the arizona law. and today's arguments on the heels of another case that could roll back a key portion of the voting rights act of 1965. for more on today's arguments, we turn as always to marcia coyle of the "national law journal." she was in the courtroom this morning, and is back with us tonight. so the outcome, marcia, of this could actually tip the federal-state balance on who gets to govern how we vote. >> that's true, gwen. the question before the justices is where do you draw the line between who has the authority to regulate elections. the election clause of the constitution actually gives authority to both. but where is the line when one crosses or goes too far than the other doe
a government shutdown, we update the short- and long-term budget battles. >> sreenivasan: paul solman looks at free trade through the eyes of a classic american brand, getting wet in the global market. >> i know that every surfboard that comes into america comes in duty free. and when i sell a surfboard to australia, japan, europe, its a 20% to 25% duty that they have to pay to get mine. >> brown: we continue our series on how broadband technoly is changing our lives. tonight, a look at chattanooga, tennessee-- home of the nation's fastest internet connections. >> sreenivasan: and, spencer michaels has the story of photo journalists who risked their lives to tell the stories of iraqis in the early days of the war. >> as photographers, we're always looking for ways to communicate the urgency of horrible drama in these situations. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, a
. >> ( translated ): it is the duty of the israeli government to at least halt the activity so that we can speak of issues. and when we define our borders and their borders together, each side will know its territory in which it can do whatever it pleases. so the issue of settlement is clear. >> warner: but the president said pre-conditions for talks were counter-productive. >> we do not consider continued settlement activity to be constructive, to be appropriate, to be something that can advance the cause of peace. if the only way to even begin the conversations is that we get everything right at the outset, or at least each party is then we're never going to get to the broader issue, which is how do you actually structure a state of palestine that is a sovereign, contiguous, and provide the palestinian people dignity. >> warner: the president also met with young palestinians, many of whom have lost faith in any resolution to the decades- long conflict. back in jerusalem, before a larger crowd of similarly-young israelis the president gave the featured address of his mideast tour. while reitera
the facts before me, that we know the syrian government has the capacity to carry out chemical weapon attacks. we know that there are those in the syrian government who have expressed a willingness to use chemical weapons if necessary to protect themselves. i am deeply skeptical of any claim that in fact it was the opposition that used chemical weapons. the broader point is, is that once we establish the facts, i have made clear that the use of chemical weapons is a game changer. >> warner: both leaders spoke extensively about iran and about the different timetables the countries are on for possible military action to prevent an iranian nuclear weapon. mr. obama said he thinks there is still time for diplomacy but added: >> each country has to make its own decisions when it comes to the awesome decision to engage in any kind of military action. and israel is differently situated than the united states, and i would not expect that the prime minister would make a decision about his country's security and defer that to any other country, any more than the united states would defer our de
by the intelligence agencies of governments who did not support my decision to remove saddam and it is true that much of the intelligence turned out to be wrong. >> warner: a report released this month put the cost of iraq's reconstruction at more than $60 billion so far. that on top of 1.7 trillion in estimated war costs according to a recent study by brown university. today some baghdad residents spoke of little progress and expressed anger at the united states. >> the americans did not do anything when they came to iraq. they granted freedom to iraq? what freedom are they talking about? >> warner: in washington, president obama issued a statement marking the anniversary saying he joined in paying tribute to all who served and sacrificed in one of our nation's longest wars. earlier i spoke to jane arraf a reporter earlier, i spoke to jane arraf, a reporter for al-jazeera english and the christian science monitor, about today's violence in baghdad and life in post-war iraq. welcome jane. what is known about who or what's behind today's car bombings and suicide attacks? >> well, the finger, judy, is
is this new tone going to be translated into the hard work of actually governing the church? there, of course, the challenges are considerably more steep >> ifill: we continue our series of stories about the middle east, margaret warner reports on the divide among the two leading palestinian factions, and its impact on the quest for peace. . >> it is really a divide over power. who's goi toontl what and what's going to be in a stronger position to win the palestinian people and who's going to have the narrative on its side? >> woodruff: and we examine a dramatic shift in public opinion with a majority of americans supporting same sex marriage. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated the idethaall peopleeserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting
substantial losses to help the government raise $7.5 gill i don't know and the country's second largest bank will be shut down. the parliament rejected an earlier plan to tax all bank deposits large and small. but this new agreement sparked little optimism in nicosia, the capital. >> the decisions that were taken were harsh. it is a catastrophe. it will be a long time before things are right again. >> it's a big shame what has happened with the way things were going, what else could they do? there was no other solution. god help us all. >> warner: the bailout does prevent cyprus from falling out of the euro currency system. a prospect that alarmed financial markets last week. still, the cyprusite foreign minister don't sound relieved. >> we feel rather bitter. we feel rather that we have not been treated the same way as other partners. probably being the smallest, i don't know. but we are a resilient people. we are going to fight. >> warner: the nuzzles got a chilly reception in russia where depositors hold an estimated $26 billion in cyprus banks but in germany chancellor angela merkel prai
in the election and is now in the government said we don't need-- a second palestinian state. that isn't new thinking. and he said very pointedly, people can't be occupiers in their own land. in order, he was rejecting the ideaçó that israelis don't have the right to live anywhere they want in the entire territory. today i talked to ashwari, a palestinian very prominent, still member of the p.l.o. executive committee and she said we don't need new language and thinking we need new will and courage by the united states and palestinians were widespread in their disappointment with the trip because they felt that the president had really embraced the israeli kind of view of this conflict, and had not expressed a willingness to press for some free zone settlement. it does not mean something may not happen. but you could see that new thinking is going to come hard in this region of a very old conflict. >> margaret warner, thank you very much, joining us from amman. >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": chicago's plans to shutter public schools; the growing gap on how internet access is bei
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)